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Manufacturer brings productivity everywhere with mobile workstations

Mobile powered workstations bring improvements to Mississippi assembly plants.
By Josh Bond, Associate Editor
October 22, 2011

Looking back, John Larrabee, information technology manager for Hol-Mac Corp., notes the irony of installing a wireless computer network throughout the Mississippi manufacturing facility when computers were still positioned on stationary stands. Today, by capitalizing on the versatility of mobile powered workstations, the company has improved efficiency, productivity and accuracy.

As a contract manufacturer, the company custom designs, fabricates, machines, finishes and assembles steel components for customers that include John Deere and Caterpillar. Their workstations must be versatile to accommodate the custom nature of the work. The company purchased 18 mobile powered workstations designed to hold and power a variety of electronic equipment that includes computers, printers, scales, scanners and other devices.  The carts can power up to four devices at once for 8 to 12 hours of normal use, significantly reducing foot travel and paperwork.

“We needed something mobile and powered that enabled our technicians to bring the test equipment to the job,” Larrabee says. “But we also needed something that could withstand a harsh environment in our machining center.  The standard rubber casters would not hold up in this environment, so we had to go with special steel wheels.”

Each cart is also equipped with a 750-watt inverter, a 20-amp charger, a 100-amp-hour battery, a post-mounted LCD holder, a 3-inch drawer, and an extra variable-height shelf. Machinists use them to access databases and check inventory. The carts are also used for testing and quality assurance. The units have also improved accuracy in shipping and receiving.

Newcastle Systems
781-935-3450
http://www.newcastlesys.com

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About the Author

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Josh Bond
Associate Editor

Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce.


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