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NA 2010 Keynote Wrap Up: Where will we find our skilled workers?

By Modern Materials Handling Staff
May 11, 2010

The materials handling industry in the United States is growing, meaning there will be a greater demand for skilled workers. Therefore, increasing the number of materials handling educational programs across the country to create a successful conduit for companies to find skilled employees is vital.

That was just one of the messages delivered during the Keynote Series session “How Industry is Changing Material Handling Training and Education.”

“The need is already beginning to surface, and we’re trying to stay ahead of the curve.” said Allan Howie, MHIA director of continuing education and professional development.

According to keynoter Don Gillman, director of the Applied Technology Center, “Beginning at the high school level, the goal is to expose students to our invisible industry. Kids see product on store shelves, but they don’t have any idea how it got there. Our goal is to heighten their awareness of the materials handling industry at the 9th grade level and provide career-based programs that lead to the next level of education—vocational training, associate’s degrees, bachelor degrees and beyond.”

Curriculums are shaped with input from industry leaders to keep content current. This is an on-going effort, considering the rapidly advancing technology and processes in today’s warehouses and DCs.

Attendees were also strongly encouraged to contact MHIA and the Keynote speakers for assistance in creating local programs.

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