NA 2010 Keynote Wrap Up: Where will we find our skilled workers?

The materials handling industry in the United States is growing, meaning there will be a greater demand for skilled workers.

By ·

The materials handling industry in the United States is growing, meaning there will be a greater demand for skilled workers. Therefore, increasing the number of materials handling educational programs across the country to create a successful conduit for companies to find skilled employees is vital.

That was just one of the messages delivered during the Keynote Series session “How Industry is Changing Material Handling Training and Education.”

“The need is already beginning to surface, and we’re trying to stay ahead of the curve.” said Allan Howie, MHIA director of continuing education and professional development.

According to keynoter Don Gillman, director of the Applied Technology Center, “Beginning at the high school level, the goal is to expose students to our invisible industry. Kids see product on store shelves, but they don’t have any idea how it got there. Our goal is to heighten their awareness of the materials handling industry at the 9th grade level and provide career-based programs that lead to the next level of education—vocational training, associate’s degrees, bachelor degrees and beyond.”

Curriculums are shaped with input from industry leaders to keep content current. This is an on-going effort, considering the rapidly advancing technology and processes in today’s warehouses and DCs.

Attendees were also strongly encouraged to contact MHIA and the Keynote speakers for assistance in creating local programs.


Subscribe to Modern Materials Handling Magazine!

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Find out what the world’s most innovative companies are doing to improve productivity in their plants and distribution centers.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Article Topics

Applied Technology Center · Education · MHI · NA 2010 · · All Topics
Latest Whitepaper
Your Guide to Voice for the Warehouse
Is voice a good fit for my operation? How would voice work in my warehouse? With the help of the Vitech Guide to Voice, you can find all the answers to your voice questions in one place.
Download Today!
From the October 2017 Modern Materials Handling Issue
An early adopter, Rochester Drug Cooperative is using robotic piece-picking technology to complement picking of slow-moving items. System report for Rochester Drug Cooperative, Robotic picking and inventory management, Innovative distribution center robotics solutions , IAM Robotics case study
Injecting agility into WMS implementation
The Big Picture: Business as Unusual
View More From this Issue
Subscribe to Our Email Newsletter
Sign up today to receive our FREE, weekly email newsletter!
Latest Webcast
The State of the DC Voice Market
A lot has changed in the last 10 years, especially in voice technology. This webinar will cover the state of the voice market, review two leading voice solutions and help you gain a better understanding of the options and capabilities available today.
Register Today!
EDITORS' PICKS
Rochester Drug Cooperative: Robots ready for work
It’s still early stages, but Rochester Drug Cooperative is proving that mobile robotic piece...
Manufacturing Day: 2,716 events from Hawaii to Alaska to Puerto Rico
Events to be scheduled throughout the month, so the remaining 249,185 manufacturing firms in the...

System Report: Pouch sorter powers Stage’s fulfillment needs
How a hometown department store chain transformed its e-fulfillment processes with pouch sortation...
Cubing and Weighing Equipment: Measure Up
The use of cubing and weighing equipment is growing beyond dimensional weight applications.