Conveyor technology: Are you thinking differently?

With new distribution requirements and more investment in automation underway, Modern set out to find how readers are now approaching the use of conveyors and sortation systems.
By Bob Trebilcock, Executive Editor
April 01, 2013 - MMH Editorial

To answer those questions, Peerless Research Group (PRG) surveyed subscribers of Modern as well as a sample of recipients of our e-newsletters. We received more than 200 qualified responses, defined as a reader who buys or uses conveyor. The respondents represented a range of company sizes, with 27% reporting revenues of more than $500 million, 15% reporting revenues of more than $100 million and the remainder less than $100 million.

While our respondents work in facilities that average 157,000 square feet, 20% work in facilities with more than 500,000 square feet, including 9% who work in facilities of more than 1 million square feet.

They also represent a mix of manufacturers, distributors and warehouses associated with manufacturing:

  • 66% have manufacturing responsibilities
  • 43% have warehousing responsibilities
  • 40% have distribution responsibilities

The fact that the numbers add up to more than 100% illustrates the changing nature of warehousing and distribution today: Many facilities are responsible for more than one duty.

Finally, our respondents represent a variety of industries, from automotive to food and beverage to the chemical industry to retail trade. Here are the most important results.




About the Author

Bob Trebilcock
Executive Editor

Bob Trebilcock, executive editor, has covered materials handling, technology and supply chain topics for Modern Materials Handling since 1984. More recently, Trebilcock became editorial director of Supply Chain Management Review. A graduate of Bowling Green State University, Trebilcock lives in Keene, NH. He can be reached at 603-357-0484.


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