ILWU must get real

Office clerical workers and waterfront employers will resume their talks tomorrow. And while both sides report that some progress was made over the past weekend, a new contract may still be a distant goal.
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By Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
July 20, 2010 - LM Editorial

As noted in our news section last week by my colleague, Jeff Berman, the Ports of Los Angles and Long Beach are back on track to handle Peak Season volumes once again. But Southern California shippers will be keeping an eye on how labor/management negotiations are going before committing to any long-term strategies at these key ocean cargo gateways.

Office clerical workers and waterfront employers will resume their talks tomorrow. And while both sides report that some progress was made over the past weekend, a new contract may still be a distant goal.

Which begs the question: why would handsomely-compensated office workers walk off a job in today‚Äôs fragile economy?  They also tried to place pickets at several terminals to keep dockworkers from doing the heavy lifting, but a local court ruling put an end to that.

The Office Clerical Unit of International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 63 may be right in objecting to some outsourcing of information technology, but its resistance to embracing new market realities will only undermine its future.



About the Author

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Patrick Burnson
Executive Editor

Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review magazines and web sites. Patrick is a widely-published writer and editor who has spent most of his career covering international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. You can reach him directly at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


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Article Topics

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About the Author

Patrick Burnson, Executive Editor
Patrick Burnson is executive editor for Logistics Management and Supply Chain Management Review. Patrick covers international trade, global logistics, and supply chain management. He lives and works in San Francisco, providing readers with a Pacific Rim perspective on industry trends and forecasts. Contact Patrick Burnson

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