Automation product: Printer-applicator prints, encodes and applies RFID labels

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
October 26, 2010 - MMH Editorial

The model 5300rfid label printer-applicator prints, encodes, verifies and applies pressure-sensitive RFID smart labels to cartons and pallet loads in one automatic operation. As the label is printed, the integrated encoder simultaneously transfers digital information to the ultra-high frequency (UHF) transponder embedded in the pressure-sensitive label material. If the system determines that a tag is unverifiable, it rejects the label prior to application. The printer includes thermal/thermal-transfer print-encode engines to produce imprints with text, bar codes and graphics at 203 or 300 dpi. Depending upon the print engine, labels can measure up to 5 x 6 inches and output at speeds up to 12 inches per second. Weber Marking Systems, 847-364-8500, www.webermarking.com.



Subscribe to Modern Materials Handling magazine

Subscribe today. It's FREE!
Find out what the world's most innovative companies are doing to improve productivity in their plants and distribution centers.
Start your FREE subscription today!

Recent Entries

Survey of economic activity shows July new business volume up 4% year-over-year, down 14% month-to-month, up 8% year-to-date.

According to Panjiva data, July shipments-at 952,126-were up 1 percent over June, following sequential gains of 7 percent for May over April and 1 percent for June over May.

40.6 million-square-foot WLC to yield an estimated 13,000 construction jobs and 20,000 permanent jobs at a variety of skill levels.

Study illustrates how worker and pallet location can influence stress on back muscles and provides suggestions for improvement.

Supply Chain Expert John Caltagirone is working with an increasing number of large companies that need help addressing key issues that “keep them up at night.” Here’s what Caltagirone recommends supply chain managers do right now to prepare for the future.

About the Author

Bob Heaney is a seasoned professional with over 25 years of distinguished leadership experience in research, analysis, and advisory roles in Supply Chain Engineering. Heaney’s coverage area within Aberdeen includes various elements of Supply Chain Execution (Transportation Management, Warehouse Management, Distributed Order Management and Supply Chain Visibility). Contact Bob Heaney

Comments

Post a comment
Commenting is not available in this channel entry.


© Copyright 2015 Peerless Media LLC, a division of EH Publishing, Inc • 111 Speen Street, Ste 200, Framingham, MA 01701 USA