Toyota donates lift truck to Midwest Food Bank

Locally manufactured forklift to assist food bank serving the state of Indiana.
By Modern Materials Handling Staff
February 12, 2013 - MMH Editorial

Toyota Material Handling, U.S.A., Inc. (TMHU), has donated an internal combustion lift truck to The Midwest Food Bank of Indianapolis, Ind.

The Midwest Food Bank is committed to serving those throughout the state of Indiana. The donated Toyota forklift, which was manufactured approximately 40 minutes away at Toyota Industrial Equipment Mfg., Inc. (TIEM) in Columbus, Ind., will handle the loading and unloading of food and supplies used to help feed an estimated 60,000 individuals through 230 agencies.

“This gift will allow us to continue delivering food to those in need both here in Indiana and to other states recovering from natural disasters,” said John Whitaker, director of operations for the food bank.

“Often times much needed material handling equipment is a luxury for resource-constrained, not-for-profit groups,” said Jeff Rufener, president of TMHU. “Toyota is honored that our locally made forklift will assist this worthy organization in serving those in need throughout the state.”



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About the Author

Josh Bond, Associate Editor
Josh Bond is an associate editor to Modern. Josh was formerly Modern’s lift truck columnist and contributing editor, has a degree in Journalism from Keene State College and has studied business management at Franklin Pierce. Contact Josh Bond

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